Shethjuice

Post(s) tagged with "news"

America- Runs on soda?

Recently, a ban on soda has pioneered by Mayor Bloomberg- the ban is to set a cap on the sizes sold. However, Bloomberg isn’t the one who is authorized to call the shots, it’s said to be the City Council’s territory. The Judge called Bloomberg’s soda ban “arbitrary and capricious,” and rejected the restrictions. However, Bloomberg states that he will challenge the ruling.

There are a few challenges with this ban:
1- It isn’t very consistent:
    Because this only applies to sodas, this excludes all of the other sugary drinks, e.g. Starbucks, frostees, etc.

2. It would cost businesses money
    Many businesses are already hurting. If this is going to be implemented, businesses are going to lose money from sales. To get them on board make an incentive.

3.Grocery stores and gas stations weren’t on the list

I think Bloomberg is on the right track, but he went for the layup before he had the ball in his hand. 

Thoughts? 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/11/nyc-soda-ban-dismissed-judge-large-sugary-drinks_n_2854563.html

Make your own gun with a 3D printer

Wow, let’s just throw all the regulations out the window….

thoughts? 

Seriously?! Just let them sell cookies and let em be ⇢
rockyanderson2012:


In some respects this [the Obama administration] is worse than Bush. First, because Obama has claimed the right to assassinate American citizens whom he suspects of “terrorism,” merely on the grounds of his own suspicion or that of the CIA, something Bush never claimed publicly.Second, Obama says that the government can detain you indefinitely, even if you have been exonerated in a trial, and he has publicly floated the idea of “preventive detention.”Third, the Obama administration, in expanding the use of unmanned drone attacks, argues that the U.S. has the authority under international law to use extrajudicial killing in sovereign countries with which it is not at war. Such measures by Bush were widely considered by liberals and progressives to be outrages and were roundly, and correctly, protested. But those acts which may have been construed (wishfully or not) as anomalies under the Bush regime have now been consecrated into “standard operating procedure” by Obama, who claims, as did Bush, executive privilege and state secrecy in defending the crime of aggressive war.Unsurprisingly the Obama administration has refused to prosecute any members of the Bush regime who are responsible for war crimes, including some who admitted to waterboarding and other forms of torture, thereby making their actions acceptable for him or any future president.


 It is now common knowledge that Barack Obama has openly ordered the assassination of an American citizen, Anwar al-Awlaki. Al-Awlaki is suspected of participating in plots by Al Qaeda. He denies these charges. No matter. Without trial or other judicial proceeding, the administration has simply put him on the to-be-killed list.
 Whistleblowers in the military have now leaked a video showing U.S. troops firing on an unarmed party of Iraqis in 2007, including two journalists, and then firing on those who attempted to rescue them, including two children. As ugly as this video of the killing of 12 Iraqis was, the chatter recorded in the helicopter cockpit is even more monstrous. The Pentagon says that there will be no charges against these soldiers and the media absolves them of blame. “They were under stress,” the story goes; “Our brave men and women must be supported.” Meanwhile those who leaked the video came under government surveillance and are targeted as “national security” threats.
 The Pentagon has recently acknowledged, after denials, a massacre near the city of Gardez, Afghanistan, on February 12, 2010. Five people were killed, including two pregnant women, leaving 16 children motherless. The U.S. military first said the two men killed were insurgents and the women were victims of a family “honor killing,” but the Afghan government accepts the eyewitness reports that U.S. Special Forces killed the men (a police officer and a lawyer) and the women, and then dug their own bullets out of the women’s bodies to destroy evidence. Top U.S. military officials have now admitted that U.S. soldiers killed the family in their house.

rockyanderson2012:

In some respects this [the Obama administration] is worse than Bush. First, because Obama has claimed the right to assassinate American citizens whom he suspects of “terrorism,” merely on the grounds of his own suspicion or that of the CIA, something Bush never claimed publicly.

Second, Obama says that the government can detain you indefinitely, even if you have been exonerated in a trial, and he has publicly floated the idea of “preventive detention.”

Third, the Obama administration, in expanding the use of unmanned drone attacks, argues that the U.S. has the authority under international law to use extrajudicial killing in sovereign countries with which it is not at war. 

Such measures by Bush were widely considered by liberals and progressives to be outrages and were roundly, and correctly, protested. But those acts which may have been construed (wishfully or not) as anomalies under the Bush regime have now been consecrated into “standard operating procedure” by Obama, who claims, as did Bush, executive privilege and state secrecy in defending the crime of aggressive war.

Unsurprisingly the Obama administration has refused to prosecute any members of the Bush regime who are responsible for war crimes, including some who admitted to waterboarding and other forms of torture, thereby making their actions acceptable for him or any future president.
  1.  It is now common knowledge that Barack Obama has openly ordered the assassination of an American citizen, Anwar al-Awlaki. Al-Awlaki is suspected of participating in plots by Al Qaeda. He denies these charges. No matter. Without trial or other judicial proceeding, the administration has simply put him on the to-be-killed list.
  2.  Whistleblowers in the military have now leaked a video showing U.S. troops firing on an unarmed party of Iraqis in 2007, including two journalists, and then firing on those who attempted to rescue them, including two children. As ugly as this video of the killing of 12 Iraqis was, the chatter recorded in the helicopter cockpit is even more monstrous. The Pentagon says that there will be no charges against these soldiers and the media absolves them of blame. “They were under stress,” the story goes; “Our brave men and women must be supported.” Meanwhile those who leaked the video came under government surveillance and are targeted as “national security” threats.
  3.  The Pentagon has recently acknowledged, after denials, a massacre near the city of Gardez, Afghanistan, on February 12, 2010. Five people were killed, including two pregnant women, leaving 16 children motherless. The U.S. military first said the two men killed were insurgents and the women were victims of a family “honor killing,” but the Afghan government accepts the eyewitness reports that U.S. Special Forces killed the men (a police officer and a lawyer) and the women, and then dug their own bullets out of the women’s bodies to destroy evidence. Top U.S. military officials have now admitted that U.S. soldiers killed the family in their house.

Rocky Anderson - Justice Party Presidential Candidate 

Everyone should read this interview with President Obama by one of my favorite journalists, Fareed Zakaria. ⇢

indreamsandbydreams:

I just think Obama is very wise and has a lot of foresight and America’s political theatre upsets me because it is the very same who inhibit him from getting anything done who loudly proclaim he is a president who can’t get anything done. I have not ONCE heard a viable argument from the talking heads who oppose him idealogically. I’m open to criticisms of his presidency, but you gotta give me something that actually makes fucking sense.

New York City Council to Vote Against Corporate Personhood, Citizens United ⇢

cultureofresistance:

Missoula, Montana; Boulder, Colorado; and South Miami, Florida, have all done it, but you know it’s really catching on when the Big Apple jumps on board. The New York City Council will vote Wednesday to get rid of corporate personhood in a growing nationwide backlash against the much-maligned Citizen’s United ruling.

Passed on January 21, 2010, Citizens United gave corporations the same political rights as people, opening the door for nearly unlimited political spending on elections. Though there are boundaries keeping a candidate from receiving or soliciting money directly from a corporation, the shifting of the rules and the weaknesses of the Federal Election Commission make this increasingly difficult to enforce.

Critics, including those associated with the Occupy movement, see Citizens United as a danger to democratic values.

We “are expecting elected officials to heed the call for constitutional reform that makes clear that democracy is for people, not for corporations,” said Jonah Minkoff-Zern, senior organizer of Public Citizen’s Democracy is for People Campaign.

New York City would be at least the seventh state to take up a similar resolution, but it will take movement in Congress to overturn the Supreme Court’s decision on the case.

In 2011, four constitutional amendments to overturn the case were introduced. To pass, two-thirds of lawmakers in both houses must vote for the changes. 

“People across the country are standing up to reclaim our democracy,” said Minkoff-Zern. “New York City should support this movement by passing this resolution.”

We are moving rapidly from an era of an oligopoly of content providers to an oligopoly of content controllers: new choke points. This is not media consolidation in the traditional sense, where a few huge conglomerates used economies of scale to dominate journalism by dominating the local and national agendas. This consolidation, to a very few companies plus increasing government intervention, is even more dangerous — and information providers of all kinds are finally starting to grasp what’s happening.

-

Dan Gillmor, Professor, Cronkite School of Journalism. 2012 will be the year of the content-controller oligopoly.

Nieman Lab is running an interesting 2012 preview series by asking prominent journalism observers what they think the upcoming year will hold. 

Gillmor believes the open Internet — where content, creativity and innovation has flourished —  is being constricted by choke points that include:

  • Search Engines
  • Wire-line Internet service providers
  • Mobile carriers
  • Apple
  • The copyright cartel
  • Government

Click through to read what he means by each. It’s a very real — if sobering — analysis of our future ability to find, create and share information with one another.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Source: futurejournalismproject

FBI Says Activists Who Investigate Factory Farms Can Be Prosecuted as Terrorists ⇢

cultureofresistance:

The FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force has kept files on activists who expose animal welfare abuses on factory farms and recommended prosecuting them as terrorists, according to a new document uncovered through the Freedom of Information Act.

This new information comes as the Center for Constitutional Rights has filed a lawsuit challenging the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) as unconstitutional because its vague wording has had a chilling effect on political activism. This document adds to the evidence demonstrating that the AETA goes far beyond property destruction, as its supporters claim.

The 2003 FBI file details the work of several animal rights activists who used undercover investigation to document repeated animal welfare violations. The FBI special agent who authored the report said they “illegally entered buildings owned by [redacted] Farm… and videotaped conditions of animals.”

The animal activists caused “economic loss” to businesses, the FBI says. And they also openly rescued several animals from the abusive conditions. This was not done covertly in the style of underground groups like the Animal Liberation Front — it was an act of non-violent civil disobedience and, as the FBI agent notes, the activists distributed press releases and conducted media interviews taking responsibility for their actions.

Based on these acts — trespassing in order to photograph and videotape abuses on factory farms — the agent concludes there “is a reasonable indication” that the activists “have violated the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, 18 USC Section 43 (a).”

The file was uncovered through a FOIA request by Ryan Shapiro, who is one of the activists mentioned. The file is available for download here. [Please note that this document has additional redactions in order to protect the identities of the other activists, at their request.] Shapiro is now a doctoral candidate at MIT.

indreamsandbydreams:

washingtonpoststyle:

Zeitgeist 2011: Year in Review.

Yeah it’s basically a Google ad, but it’s also basically beautiful.

well obviously this made me weep

just….

people,

man.

people.

Source: washingtonpoststyle

latimes:

Sold into slavery as a girl, Shyima Hall becomes a U.S. citizen: When she was 10, Shyima Hall was smuggled from Egypt into the U.S. as a slave to a family in Irvine. In Montebello on Thursday, she became an American citizen.

Hall said her dream now is to become a federal agent for ICE to help crack down on human trafficking and free the enslaved.

Your feel-good story of the day.
Photo:   Shyima Hall, 22, moments after becoming a U.S. citizen. She lives in Beaumont and is deciding whether to finish a college degree or apply for the local police force. Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Sold into slavery as a girl, Shyima Hall becomes a U.S. citizen: When she was 10, Shyima Hall was smuggled from Egypt into the U.S. as a slave to a family in Irvine. In Montebello on Thursday, she became an American citizen.

Hall said her dream now is to become a federal agent for ICE to help crack down on human trafficking and free the enslaved.

Your feel-good story of the day.

Photo: Shyima Hall, 22, moments after becoming a U.S. citizen. She lives in Beaumont and is deciding whether to finish a college degree or apply for the local police force. Credit: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

mothernaturenetwork:

Don’t miss annual Geminid meteor showerThe meteor shower, which is expected to peak on night of Dec. 13, is known for its slow and bright meteors, with some of them appearing yellowish in color.

mothernaturenetwork:

Don’t miss annual Geminid meteor shower
The meteor shower, which is expected to peak on night of Dec. 13, is known for its slow and bright meteors, with some of them appearing yellowish in color.

mothernaturenetwork:

BP accuses Halliburton of destroying Gulf spill evidenceBP says Halliburton destroyed evidence that the oilfield services company did inadequate cement work on the oil well that blew out last year.

mothernaturenetwork:

BP accuses Halliburton of destroying Gulf spill evidence
BP says Halliburton destroyed evidence that the oilfield services company did inadequate cement work on the oil well that blew out last year.

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA’s Kepler finds first potentially habitable planetNewly discovered alien planet has a radius that is 2.4 times that of Earth, and the two planets have roughly similar temperatures.

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA’s Kepler finds first potentially habitable planet
Newly discovered alien planet has a radius that is 2.4 times that of Earth, and the two planets have roughly similar temperatures.

Another Rick Perry Fail. ⇢

Is it me or does he always look high? 

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